Photography Cutouts

Photography Cutouts

Blue Polaroid, 19”W x 20”H x 5”D, Made from a  20”x 24” Polaroid Photograph, Photography: Cutout, 1996

Blue Polaroid, 19”W x 20”H x 5”D, Made from a  20”x 24” Polaroid Photograph, Photography: Cutout, 1996

 
 Brown With Opening, 27”W x 22”H x 5”D,  Cibachrome Print, Photography: Cutout, 1996  

 Brown With Opening, 27”W x 22”H x 5”D,  Cibachrome Print, Photography: Cutout, 1996

 

 
Grey, 17”W x 16”H x 4”D,  Cibachrome Print, Photography: Cutout, 1996  

Grey, 17”W x 16”H x 4”D,  Cibachrome Print, Photography: Cutout, 1996

 

 
Aqua Black with Red Center, 20”W x 27”H x 4”D, Cibachrome Print, Photography: Cutout, 1996

Aqua Black with Red Center, 20”W x 27”H x 4”D, Cibachrome Print, Photography: Cutout, 1996

 
Black White, 27”W x 21”H x 7”D, Chromatic Print, Photography: Cutout, 1996

Black White, 27”W x 21”H x 7”D, Chromatic Print, Photography: Cutout, 1996

Gold Blue, 29”W x 21”H x 3”D, Cibachrome Print, Photography: Cutout, 1996

Gold Blue, 29”W x 21”H x 3”D, Cibachrome Print, Photography: Cutout, 1996

 
Yellow Blue Polaroid, 19”W x 24”H x 2”D, Made from a  20”x 24” Polaroid Print, Photography: Cutout, 1996

Yellow Blue Polaroid, 19”W x 24”H x 2”D, Made from a  20”x 24” Polaroid Print, Photography: Cutout, 1996

 
Brown Bronze, 13”W x 10”H x 3”D, Cibachrome Print, Photography: Cutout, 1996

Brown Bronze, 13”W x 10”H x 3”D, Cibachrome Print, Photography: Cutout, 1996


Photography:  Cutouts
2009-1996

Photographs That Confound

Space Sites 1

“Using photography to reinterpret earlier work, Katinka Mann has transformed shaped canvases into cut andfolded wall reliefs that subtly taper with the evidence before our eyes.  Texture, dimension and, above all, spatial “relationships” are redefined in terms of a new and remarkably effective approach to perception.

Ms. Mann has employed light to color and model the original shapes making interior spaces glow and exterior planes shimmer with unseen radiance.  Her Polaroid and Cibachrome Prints are then reshaped to confound notions of depth and surface, negative and positive, recession and protrusion.

In “Grey” for example, a shadowed area is brought forward, physically defying its implicit depth.  “Brown With Opening” turns an apparent hole into an advancing shape.  In several works, highlighted textures are belied by the prints’ smooth, shiny surfaces.  Colors that sparkle with the metallic luster of hot-rod enamel are also illusory, evoked by the nuances of reflected light.”

Helen A. Harrison, The New York Times,
10/96


“There is a high-tech quality inherent in the glossy surfaces of Ms. Mann’s three dimensional photographic constructions and this gives them a very contemporary character.  Ms. Mann’s freestanding pieces are part of series of geometric constructions she has been exploring since the mid-1980’s.  A vertical slit allowing an illuminated stripe and variable shadows is a complex feature in recent examples.  It is a direction with considerable potential.”

Phyllis Braff, The New Times, 1/01


“Through her constructions, Katinka Mann seeks the very nature of light and its ability to create color and bold form.  The artist uses light to create not only color, but the illusion of space and form.  In the process she challenges our assumptions about each.  In viewing the pieces, it is often difficult to discern between what is concrete and what is illusion where does a shadow end and the actual passage of space begin. Moreover, the pieces seem to capture the very nature of their creation: light seems to emanate from within, rather than as a reflection of the world around them.”

Heckscher Museum of Art @Bryant Library, Janie Welker, Asst. Curator of Photography, Exhibition Brochure
“Inner Light” 1/01